19 June 2011

55. Square 4X4 : How many Squares?

Easy Medium Hard Extreme


How many squares in the figure? It looks easy, but make sure you count them all!

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A total of 16 squares
1X1 squares : 9
2X2 squares : 5
3X3 squares : 1
4X4 squares : 1

98 comments:

Anonymous said...

16

Anonymous said...

What about the small squares the match heads and the ends make between the squares....

Anonymous said...

0

Cody Adams said...

If you look close there isn't a 3x3 square. None of the sticks connect all the way across.

Cody Adams said...

If you look close there isn't a 3x3 square. None of the sticks actually go across to make a 3x3 square.

Anonymous said...

when does a square turn into a rectangle? and does the L shape a real square shape?

Rodney Merrill said...

Where is the 3 x 3?

Anonymous said...

i dont see how you can count rectangulars as squares..You are missing 4 matches to make up 16 squares...
can you explain that ???? thankssss

Anonymous said...

There are only 8 actual squares.....

Anonymous said...

There are also 2 of 1x2 squares which although most people call rectangles are still classed as a square

Anonymous said...

I've always thought the purpose of matches in a puzzle is the flexibility to move them around, without taking any away to come up with a finite answer. This is typically where people often get stuck thinking "inside the box", overlooking that matches are movable parts. This one is circulating on facebook, and if it was just about the squares, then why is it illustrated in matches instead of solid lines, I asked myself. Because matches can be moved to make more squares! My answer is 30! Thanks for indulging me!

Anonymous said...

It is 19!

Anonymous said...

they need to be touching to be squares.

Anonymous said...

are you counting the squares where the sticks meat. If so then you are wrong. There would be 22

Anonymous said...

15 or 0:

15...count big outer square first, then all the little ones inside (that's 10 so far), then the four quadrant squares that make up the big one, then the one in the middle made up by four little squares...

OR ZERO (NONE of the lines actually connect, so technically, these are just a bunch of segments that don't make any shape at all).

Adam Humenuik said...

There is actually 17. I could 6 - 2x2's not just 5.

Adam Humenuik said...

I count 17.

There are 6 2x2's!

Anonymous said...

Yes there is...bottom left

Mrs. C said...

There is NO square wherein there are 3 matches across all four sides, there is always one matchstick missing on one side. So there is no 3x3 in this puzzle.

Mrs. C said...

OHP! I retract my last comment, I finally found the 3x3.

Anonymous said...

there is a 3x3 its the bottom left side 16 is the correct number

Cheap4kids said...

The 3 by 3 starts bottom left.

Anonymous said...

I got 19

Anonymous said...

Cody start in bottom left corner 3 x 3 :)

Anonymous said...

Try again Cody gofromthebottom left over 3 up 3.

Anonymous said...

The 3x3 square is on the lower left side of the puzzle.

Anonymous said...

The bottom left corner is a 3x3

Anonymous said...

Yes they do Cody... Start from bottom left.

Mo-Mo said...

What about the 17 square? Take off the top row & the right/vertical row. That leaves another large square...or would you argue that is a rectangle. It LOOKS like a square.

Mo-Mo said...

I saw 17 squares. If you remove the very top/horizontal row that leaves another large square...or would you argue that is a rectangle? It looks like a square to me.

Anonymous said...

Lower left corner is 3x3

Anonymous said...

Cody, yes there is. Start with the second row, go across three and down three, it's the only place it is possible.
xoxo

Anonymous said...

There is one

Anonymous said...

There is a 3x3 square, second row left + 3 then 3 down.

Stevana said...

Cody, the bottom left corner is a 3x3 square, only the matchsticks outlining that square have to connect (not all within), so 16 is correct. There are nine 1x1's, five 2x2's, one 3x3, and one 4x4.

Anonymous said...

3x3 is wrong... 3 matchsticks by 4 matchsticks do not make a square. The answer is 21.

Leigh Mortimer said...

Yes they do Cody, from bottom left - it goes up three and across three to the right, then down three and back across three to reconnect with the bottom left...

LeeSwytz said...

there is no 3x3 because you only have 3 on two sides of the lower left corner. There are no squares that have 3squares on each of the four sides to make a 3x3 square.

LeeSwytz said...

there is no 3x3 as there are only 2 sides with 3 smaller squares for the lower left hand corner and there are not 3 rows of 3 anywhere in the largest square. The lower left hand corner has an "L" that - if divided - would be 3 squares to make the 3x3. 15

Anonymous said...

Duh, there is one 3 x3 square, look closely- coming from the bottom left corner...

Anonymous said...

to Cody Adams there is a 3x3 square starting at the left bottom count three right three up three left three down, therefor a 3x3 square. the correct answer is 16 total squares. and to anonymous the match head are coned so they are not actually squares.

Anonymous said...

Bottom left corner, Cody.

Anonymous said...

Yes there is one 3 x 3 square. Start in the bottom left corner and count 3 sticks right or up and then keep turning & counting by three's to form the square.

fatlonelycanadian said...

17 actually... you missd a 2x2 square.

Anonymous said...

There is a 3x3 square, bottom left corner

Anonymous said...

Cody, look again. start at the bottom left corner, there is a 3x3.

Anonymous said...

@Cody, there is, on the lower right

Anonymous said...

I can't see a 3x3

Anonymous said...

Cody,
Starting from the bottom left corner go three over and the up. I had to turn the image sideways to see it.

Anonymous said...

Cody - Bottom left 3x3 quadrant.

Anonymous said...

21

Anonymous said...

There is a 3x3 square.
Start at the bottom left, 3up and 3 over. You'll see it.

Anonymous said...

Start bottom left corner and you will see the 3x3 square

Christina Nina said...

@Cody Adams, bottom left corner is 3x3

Peter n said...

If you look close they do connect buddy

Michael Mills said...

yes there is a 3x3 from bottom left count up 3 accross 3 down 3 and back 3 and there is your 16th square

Anonymous said...

Where the heck did someone come up with 6 - 2x2's ?? There are only five. Four in each corner of the single large square, and a final 2x2 in the center.

If there were six, there would have to be one of four other spots splitting out from the center square in one of four directions here like this (+)

And yes, there IS a 3x3 for a total of 16 squares. However, to be argumentative - there is a final 17th square containing the square image. ;-)

Anonymous said...

I think I've lost all faith in humanity. The amount of people who can't see a 3x3 square, even after being told exactly where it is!, insane!. Theres only 4 possible places for one in this square so its not exactly a trick is it.

Anonymous said...

Where is this magical 6th 2x2 that people are talking about?

Anonymous said...

Bottom left is the 3X3

Mo-Mo said...

There IS A 3X3. Start in the lower left corner, count upwards 3 sticks, count across 3 sticks, count down 3 sticks, and across 3 sticks. This makes a square & you cannot deny that anyone.

Anonymous said...

the answer is 0 because none of the matchsticks are connected...i think

Cheryl C said...

It can't be 0 because ALL of the match sticks are inside one outer square ;-) Either 1 or 15 depending on if you're counting the squares who's ends don't meet!

Anonymous said...

The answer above is correct. It is 16 squares and the 3x3 is found from the top count 3 small squares right to left and then up and down to find the 3x3.

Anonymous said...

Rectangles are not classified as squares. Squares are however rectangles. I count 15 actual squares. For a rectangle to be a square all the sides have to be the same length.

Anonymous said...

Now I see the three by three. 16

dw said...

And now for the real hardcore crowd....RECTANGLES!
6 2x1 Horizontal
6 1x2 Vertical
3 3x1 Hz
3 1x3 Vt
2 4x1 Hz
2 1x4 Vt
2 3x2 Hz
2 2x3 Vt
2 4x2 Hz
2 2x4 Vt
1 3x4 Hz
1 4x3 Vt
Grand Total = 32!!

Anonymous said...

I go with zero as well... By deff, no actual squares exist in this puzzle-

Anonymous said...

Whenver I wonder why I am doing so well in life even given the fact that I am quite lazy, all I need to do is look at comments of folks on this page and I know there are a bunch of morons out there.

There are 16 squares.
1x1 - 9
2x2 - 5 (not 6 like one tool wrote)
3x3 - 1
4x4 - 1

I cannot believe that folks in this discussion don't know the definition of a square like the person who decided if he took off the top row, a 4x3 was a square or the folks that asked if a rectangle is a square. I weep for our future.

Anonymous said...

There are also 7 tiny squares where the match heads meet. If those count then the total is 22.

Jen Ski said...

Yay I got it right!!!!

Richard Schweitzer said...

I find 15... it says there is a 3x3 square and I can't find it.

Anonymous said...

Yes there is...you're just stupid

Anonymous said...

The 3x3 is bottom left

Anonymous said...

My brain doesn't work very well. Now I see the the 3 X 3 crap.

Anonymous said...

There are 16 total squares. To find the 3x3 square begin at the lower left corner. Count 3 matches along the bottom then count 3 matches up then count 3 matches along the top then count 3 matches down to the lower left corner where you started at. There's your 3x3 square.

Bob S. said...

It's 16, end of.

So-Yeon Kim said...

Sticks "meet"

Anonymous said...

Well now aren't you fortunate to be doing so well. I'm sure it's totally necessary for all of us perfectly moronic strangers to know such personal information...
Some people here may not be great with puzzles or even logic, but at least they aren't pompous or unnecessarily rude. Way to claim douchebag of the year!

neil45th said...

Bottom left 3 up the side and 3 in right.

neil45th said...

No a rectangle is not square it is it's defining characteristic and why it has a different name in the world of quadrangles

neil45th said...

Look at the outer edges of the 2x2 etc that form squares in their own right.

neil45th said...

Square are not rectangles do you by chance mean quadrangles

Anonymous said...

A rectangle is square therefore if I counted correctly, there are 34 squares in the picture

Anonymous said...

There are blatantly 16 squares. Also, It explains how many of each there are, so why are some people still saying different? 17? what are you on? there are only 5 2x2

Anonymous said...

There are blatantly 16 squares. Also, It explains how many of each there are, so why are some people still saying different? 17? what are you on? there are only 5 2x2

Anonymous said...

16 Squares - Those who think that the its squares where the heads meet is I guess getting paranoid about the puzzle. The general idea here is to use the match stick length to make squares not its width. Secondly, there are people who are commenting on there are 0 squares for the same reason.

Rick Munn said...

A Pure Science ZERO Squares- there are no right angles - the intersection of two perpendicular straight lines.

Marissa Dingayan said...

My answer is 10... The others r rectangle shape..its not square!!!

Marissa Dingayan said...

My answer is 10..the thre rest are triangle..!!

Anonymous said...

"Argue" that is a rectangle? Wow.

Anonymous said...

There is a 3x3

Lynne Behling said...

Don't call people stupid!

doris breasseale said...

How about doubling all the lines since there are 2 equal sides on each supposedly match.

Kat said...

16. 9 small squares, 6 medium and one big. The rest are rectangles. The matches don´t really touch, they just form shapes. This riddle is for logical and spatial thinking. It is made out of matches because it´s an old kind of riddle. People played it whenever they had time. Before TV.

Anonymous said...

Stupid....

Anonymous said...

There are 16

The 3x3 square is in the bottom left corner

Jenny Redo said...

The 17th square is the one framing the puzzle outside the question.